Yami Joshi and Pulse "destroy the floor" at TED@UPS

TED@UPS Highlights

Follow this feed to get live updates from the TED@UPS conference on September 2, 2015. #TEDatUPS

TED@UPS | UPS

Did you miss the live TED@UPS updates? Don’t worry– we have you covered. Check out this post to get the play-by-play from September’s big event. (pro tip: start at the bottom and read up, each speaker is time-stamped.)

Let us know what you think on Twitter by sharing the hashtag #TEDatUPS

[LIVE BLOG FROM EVENT]

(5:15 p.m. ET) And that’s a wrap! Thanks so much for following along.

TEDatUPS-TW-LI2

(5:10 p.m. ET) This concludes Laura’s presentation. Be sure to subscribe to Longitudes emails to be notified when Laura’s full talk is available in October.

Laura Lane on stage at TED@UPS

Laura Lane on stage at TED@UPS

“I also learned, that to be the change you want to see in the world, you have to muster all of your courage, follow your heart”

“From this whole experience, I learned I never want to live with “what if’s” ever again.”

“I kept telling myself, ‘I will come back, I’m not abandoning my Rwandan friends.’”

“I‘m an American citizen – so I get to leave and live– but these Rwandans, just because they were born here – have to die? I had to do something.” 

“I am not one to automatically challenge authority – especially ones with machine guns pointed in my face but I wasn’t backing down.”

Pullquote share icon. Share

I am not one to automatically challenge authority – especially ones with machine guns pointed in my face but I wasn’t backing down.

“My only job at that point became ensuring all 267 Americans made it out alive.”

Interview: Laura speaks with Frontline about her experience in Rwanda.

“We really believed that we could forge a lasting peace…until that day… April 6, 1994 when President Habyarimana’s plane was shot down and genocide became the new reality.”

“Stepping off of the plane in Kigali, I never could have imagined…that rather than helping to implement the peace, I would actually become a first-hand witness to genocide”

“I was a ”save the world” 26 year old Foreign Service officer in my second tour of duty. I was so excited when I landed in Rwanda.”

“The big dilemma is when do you play by the rules, and when do you need to write your own”

“I have always thought “You need to be the change you want to see in the world. “ But how do you affect that change?”

lauralane1(4:57 p.m. ET) Next on stage is Laura Lane on life lessons she learned from evacuating more than 200 Americans during the Rwandan genocide. Laura currently serves as president of global public affairs for UPS. Prior to joining UPS, Laura was the head of international government affairs at Citigroup and VP for global public policy with Time Warner.She was also a diplomat in the U.S. Foreign Service and led the evacuation effort of American citizens in April 1994 with the outbreak of civil war. Want to learn more about Laura? Check out her bio.

(4:56 p.m. ET) This concludes Peter’s presentation. Be sure to subscribe to Longitudes emails to be notified when Peter’s full talk is available in October.

Peter Harris on stage at TED@UPS

Peter Harris on stage at TED@UPS

“From the circular economy from the circle of life, you never know when the next innovation will come from.”

“Investments in natural gas help to make renewable natural gas more cost effective.”

“So rotting organic waste really is not the smelly mess we tend to think of it as, but rather a golden nectar of a resource.”

Peter Harris talks sustainability:

 

“Let’s not let the waste go to waste!”

Pullquote share icon. Share

Let’s not let the waste go to waste

“How about if we think of the methane not as waste product but as a replacement for a resource – fuel.”

Read Peter’s series, Future of Cities, which gives a glimpse at the future trends we expect the world’s top cities to see.

“Globally, a truly shocking one third of our food gets wasted at some point along the supply chain – about 2 billion tons per year.”

“It’s funny, isn’t it, how different parts of your life sometimes join back up in circles?”

peterharris1(4:46 p.m ET) Next on stage is Peter Harris. As the director of sustainability for UPS’s businesses in Europe, Harris ensures that UPS innovates in a way that allows the risks associated with societal challenges, like climate change, to turn into opportunities. Peter will be explaining how trash we produce can fuel the machines that transport our critical goods. Want to learn more about Peter? Check out his bio.

Keeping the great videos coming:

(4:44 p.m. ET) This concludes Yami’s performance. Be sure to subscribe to Longitudes emails to be notified when Yami’s video is available in October.

Yami Joshi and Pulse "destroy the floor" at TED@UPS

Yami Joshi and Pulse “destroy the floor” at TED@UPS

Pullquote share icon. Share

No matter what language the song is written in, expression through dance is its own language!

Learn more about the Bharatanatyam dance that Yami and Pulse are performing on stage at TED@UPS

“As you can tell, I love dancing have found dance to be my medium to help me relieve stress. I will now be joining this authentic Indian classical dance group, Pulse.”

“If you think about it though, everyone is a dancer- even if you might have two left feet. You blink, cry, walk, skip.”

“I have been dancing ever since I was 5 years old. It has been my biggest passion and a dream to learn all the different dance forms.”

yamijoshi1(4:33 p.m. ET) Next on stage is Yami Joshi who will be dancing with her co-ed classical dance team, Pulse. Their motto is “Dance Hard, Destroy the Floor.” Yami is an organizational development specialist at UPS, where she develops and implements organizational strategies to improve the employee experience. Want to learn more about Yami? Check out her bio.

(4:32 p.m. ET) This concludes Jared’s presentation. Be sure to subscribe to Longitudes emails to be notified when Jared’s full talk is available in October.

“I had to say yes to all that was not known. I had to take the leap.”

“To say yes to things that didn’t make sense, I had to say no to the things that did.”

“I had to say yes to all that was not known. I had to take the leap.”

“To say yes to things that didn’t make sense, I had to let go of the things that did. “ 

“Pain and risk aside, stepping through barrier of fear opened up a world where I could passionately expose others to the fullness of life.” 

“Yes comes from somewhere beyond reason, from imagination and dreams.”

“Here’s the truth. There are endless reasons to say no. No gets support, no is reinforced by society, by friends and family. No makes sense.”

Pullquote share icon. Share

It is easy to say no.  No is driven by fear.

“There were so many compelling reasons to say no. But yes would simply not let us rest.”

“One of the most critical issues was that our oldest son, who has very-high functioning Asperger’s, was excelling in school and making strides socially.”

“Joining them could not have been farther from our life in Indiana, but both my wife and I felt compelled to pursue this.”

“Northern Uganda had been ravaged by a 23 year civil war led by Joseph Kony and the Lord’s Resistance Army.”

“4 years ago, a couple from our church was moving to Uganda. Knowing our passion for that part of the world, they asked us to join them at an organization called Restoration Gateway.”

Jared Hill

Jared Hill

(4:23 p.m. ET) Next on stage is Jared Hill on how we can turn the no’s we often tell ourselves into yes’s. Jared currently flies the MD-11 for UPS, for which he received the “Aircrew of the Year” award in 2014. But outside of work, his passions lie with a group of orphans at Restoration Gateway in Northern Uganda, where he recently taught math to grades three through six and now sits on their Board of Directors. Want to learn more about Jared? Check out his bio.

What is fog exactly? How does a plane land in zero visibility? UPS meteorologist Jeff Peters steers us through the facts and clever solutions:

(4: 19 p.m. ET) This concludes Kevin’s presentation. Be sure to subscribe to Longitudes emails to be notified when Kevin’s full talk is available in October.

Kevin Etter takes the stage at TED@UPS

Kevin Etter takes the stage at TED@UPS

“Think of the difference we will make in our world and in our communities if our companies donated just a handful of us.” 

“Talent sharing can be as big as becoming a secondee like me, but it can also be as small as an accounting firm offering 3-4 hours a month to balance the books for an organization.”

Pullquote share icon. Share

My company took a different path – something revolutionary in the world of global corporate philanthropy – they donated me. 

“That is what makes this something different and something special. I am a targeted donation from the private sector.“

“My employer, one of the world’s largest logistics companies, has the expertise they need.”

Click here to learn more about Gavi

“To help reach this goal, Gavi has a supply chain initiative they will roll out over the next five years.  They need help designing solutions and doing the work. But they don’t just need help – they need skilled help.”

“By the year 2020, Gavi has a goal that just over 50% of the world’s children will be fully vaccinated.”

“When Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, approached my employer asking for support, many would expect that my company would provide direct funding (writing a check) or a donation of goods or services.  My company took a different path – a new path, something revolutionary in the world of global corporate philanthropy – they donated me.” 

Kevin Etter

Kevin Etter

(4:09 p.m. ET) Next on stage is Kevin Etter on why and how companies must share their most valuable assets, people, with charitable organizations. A seasoned logistics executive, Kevin Etter has spent 32 years in positions at UPS that range from healthcare strategy to industrial engineering. Want to learn more about Kevin? Check out his bio.

(4:07 p.m. ET) This concludes Regina’s presentation. Be sure to subscribe to Longitudes emails to be notified when Regina’s full talk is available in October.

Regina Hartley takes the stage at TED@UPS

Regina Hartley takes the stage at TED@UPS

“So who are you going to bet on when it comes to a new hire? I say you should never underestimate the contender whose secret weapons are passion and purpose.” 

Companies that are committed to diversity and inclusive practices tend to support scrappers and outperform their peers.  Over a 10-year period, DiversityInc’s Top 50 Companies for Diversity outperformed the S&P 500 by 25%.”

“Take this resume. This guy’s parents put him up for adoption, he never finishes college, he job hops a few times, spends a year on a sojourn to India, and as it turns out, he has dyslexia.  Would you have hired this guy? His name is Steve Jobs.”

Pullquote share icon. Share

Scientists call it “posttraumatic growth.”  In non-scientific terms we just say “What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.”

“The conventional thinking has been that trauma leads to distress, and there’s been a lot of focus on the resulting dysfunction.  But during many studies of dysfunction, data began to reveal an unexpected insight: that even the worst circumstances can result in growth and transformation. In other words: “what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.””

“As I met successful business people and read profiles of high powered leaders, I noticed some commonality:  many experienced early hardships, everything from poverty, abandonment, the death of a parent while still quite young, to learning disabilities, violence and alcoholism.” 

“A series of odd jobs may indicate lack of focus, unpredictability, inconsistency… OR a committed struggle against obstacles”

A resume tells a story, and over the years, I have learned something about people whose experiences read like a patchwork quilt that makes me stop and fully consider them before tossing their resumes away.”

reginahartley1

Regina Hartley

(3:54 p.m. ET) Next on the stage is Regina Hartley, Human Resources Executive at UPS. In this talk, Regina touches on the benefits of adversity, the latest studies on post-traumatic growth and the fact that those who don’t always look good on paper may be just the person you need to hire.

Throughout her 25-year UPS career – working in talent acquisition, succession planning, learning and development, employee relations, and communications – Regina has seen how, given the opportunity, people with passion and purpose will astound you. Want to learn more about Regina? Check out her bio.

(3:53 p.m. ET) This concludes Jack’s presentation. Be sure to subscribe to Longitudes emails to be notified when Jack’s full talk is available in October.

“At the beginning, people will say you’re crazy… this idea won’t work.  Then when you keep going and get traction, they dig in their heels, fighting the change.  When the idea works, they say this was obvious, you all weren’t so smart.

Pullquote share icon. Share

Innovation isn’t a pet rock that needs to be sold.

“When Orion is fully deployed, it will save 100 million miles driven per year. Each year, 10 million gallons of fuel won’t be purchased and 100,000 metric tons of Co2 won’t go into the atmosphere. This adds up to a savings of $300M to $400M per year.

“I’m often asked how I convinced upper management to take a chance on this innovation.  I say I didn’t.  Innovation isn’t a pet rock that needs to be sold.

See ORION in action:

“Eventually my belief in ORION paid off.  In year five, our algorithm finally started working in the lab.

“For four years, there was research, trial and error, missteps… and criticism.”

“Even in an organization, with a culture of innovation, there will be ridicule. I was called the pie in the sky manager trying to make rocket science work.”

“What is needed to successfully innovate? Obviously, you need a good idea and great people…  But you also need to be in an organization that understands innovation.”

“This is where the idea for ORION stems.  The belief that people, even professional drivers can’t think through all these alternatives.

Learn more about ORION on Longitudes.

“The philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer said: “Truth passes through three stages; ridicule, then violent opposition, finally acceptance as if self-evident.” I believe innovative ideas pass through the same stages.”

”I lived this, on a project I led called ORION.
Pullquote share icon. Share

An innovator must be willing to look foolish to the crowd.

“ORION looks at all the things a delivery driver needs to do… the stops that need to be made, specific times customers need to be served – and create the optimal route for that day.
“ORION will optimize that list of things to do with an Operations Research algorithm that’s 1,000 pages long.
“You might be wondering why we need such a powerful algorithm…. computers are fast and we have GPS navigation.I can put it into perspective: let’s say you have six errands to do on a weekend, there are 720 ways to do those errands. If you have 10 things to do, there are over 3 million ways…”

Learn more about ORION in this WSJ feature: At UPS, the Algorithm Is the Driver.

“Now, when you look at the number of ways an average UPS driver can deliver on his or her route you get this number: 6,689,502,913,449,135,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000

“You might be wondering why we need such a powerful algorithm…. computers are fast and we have GPS navigation.I can put it into perspective: let’s say you have six errands to do on a weekend, there are 720 ways to do those errands. If you have 10 things to do, there are over 3 million ways…”

“ORION will optimize that list of things to do with an Operations Research algorithm that’s 1,000 pages long.

“ORION looks at all the things a delivery driver needs to do… the stops that need to be made, specific times customers need to be served – and create the optimal route for that day.

”I lived this, on a project I led called ORION.

“The philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer said: “Truth passes through three stages; ridicule, then violent opposition, finally acceptance as if self-evident.” I believe innovative ideas pass through the same stages.”

Jack Levis

Jack Levis

(3:43 p.m. ET) Next on stage is Jack Levis. As the senior director of process management at UPS, Jack Levis considers how a massive company can use radical technologies to improve how it runs on a grand scale. Want to learn more about Jack? Check out his bio.

(3:40 p.m. ET) And we’re back! Welcome to session 2. We have some great speakers lined up. But first, an awesome video:

 

IMG_1451

We are getting inspired here at TED@UPS. What inspires you?

(2:48 p.m. ET) It’s intermission time. We will be back at 3:30 p.m. ET for session two!

MAR_8615

(2:47 p.m. ET) This concludes Johnny’s performance.

Want to learn more about Johnny? Check out his bio.

Check out Johnny performing “Escape from Taiwan” in 2013:

Johnny Staats

Johnny Staats

(2:42 p.m. ET) Next on stage is Johnny Staats who will bring his talents to the stage alongside Dave Vaughn. During the day, Johnny is a UPS driver. At all other times, he is a world-class bluegrass mandolin, guitar, and violin player.

(2:39 p.m. ET) This concludes Kelly Lepley’s presentation. Be sure to subscribe to Longitudes emails to be notified when Kelly’s full talk is available in October.

Learn more about Kelly’s story on her Lean In page.

“I chased my first dream and have been a professional pilot for over 25 years. Following my second dream took over 40 years, but only when I did could my life finally take off and fly.

“Coming to terms with who I was required faith.  A faith in believing something unseen but deeply known and felt.

Pullquote share icon. Share

I am transgender.  To summon the courage to even utter that statement took me four decades.

“Transitioning from one gender to the other, is not for the weak at heart.

“I was ostracized from my church, my community, and accused of being unfit to parent my kids. I wound up living in a converted garage in Alaska.

Within three weeks of my disclosure, my wife had filed for divorce.  I would go on to lose my marriage, my home, and every single thing I worked for.

“For survival, I created a false identity, deceiving myself and others. In essence, I became an actor 24/7.

”I was the first born son, raised by a loving family, the one who would carry on my fathers name. But from my earliest memory I was girl.

Pullquote share icon. Share

I was the first born son, raised by a loving family, the one who would carry on my father’s name. But from my earliest memory I was girl.

“I am transgender! To summon the courage to even utter that statement took me four decades.

My first dream was realized. My second? The second…was to become the woman you see on stage …

“As beautiful and diverse as the world I see, so too is humanity.  Whether, I’m in Asia, Europe, the Middle East, or even right here in America, meeting people from all walks of life has challenged me to examine my own life and what I believed to be true.

“From my perch in the sky, I see the world from a macro view.  Whether Im over the Gobi Desert, in China, the glaciers of Alaska, or the volcanoes off of the eastern coast of Russia, I get a birds eye view to the beauty and diversity of this world.

My first dream became reality on June 28, 1986, when at 17 I took the controls of a small Cessna for the first time.

“From my earliest recollection I had two dreams, the first – to be, a pilot.  At 18 months, I saw a plane in a Christmas catalogue and my fate was sealed”.

Kelly Lepley

Kelly Lepley

(2:30 p.m. ET) Next on stage is UPS pilot Kelly Lepley. In this deeply personal talk, Kelly considers how the things we choose to hide – or embrace – can ultimately define who we are. Want to learn more about Kelly? Check out her bio.

A new partner increased Richard’s productivity at work — and led to a a cherished friendship. Follow a day in the life of Richard and Adam:

(2:24 p.m. ET) This concludes Alan Amling’s presentation. Be sure to subscribe to Longitudes emails to be notified when Alan’s full talk is available in October.

“When rules change, what was thought to be impossible becomes possible, this is when pigs really do fly.” 

Pullquote share icon. Share

While the Information Superhighway was about empowering the consumer, the MyWay Highway is about fulfilling those expectations.

“The value of inventory in the U.S. right now is $1.8 trillion dollars.  Every dollar removed from inventory because of on-demand printing or high-speed delivery means lower cost and less waste.”

“It’s estimated that these hyperloop capsules could travel between Los Angeles and San Francisco in 35 minutes less expensively with more safety than plane, train or auto.  If that comes to life, wouldn’t that become the default choice?” Now think of how that technology could impact logistics networks.

“Have you heard of the Navy’s Rail Gun?  It can fire projectiles over 100 miles with pinpoint accuracy.  Now think about adapting that technology to shoot packages.”

“Today, next generation robots are becoming easier to set up and move allowing manufacturers to make shorter runs of custom products.”

Pullquote share icon. Share

You have this “I want what I want on-demand society” bumping up against old school manufacturing and transportation.

“How do you get your specific order on-demand when the economics of transportation are built around consolidating many orders?  And by the way, how do you do all this with the least impact to the environment?”

“We’re entering the next phase of the Information Superhighway. Let’s call it the MyWay Highway.”

“Today we want what we want, not a generic product, but exactly what we want, when we want it at a price we can afford.”

Imagine you’re in the 1980’s decked out in your mullet and parachute pants.  What pigs weren’t flying then that are flying today?  How about everyday things we take for granted today like having a video chat with your family right from your phone, or controlling your home lights on vacation.” 

What happens when pigs really do fly?  When rules change, making what once seemed impossible, possible.”

Alan Amling

Alan Amling

(2:10 p.m. ET) Next up is Alan Amling. Alan will be observing how industrial-era rules are changing in manufacturing and transportation, making possible what once seemed impossible. He will peek into the future to examine how these changes will impact our on-demand society and radically transform the logistics of tomorrow.

As the VP of Global Logistics and Marketing, Amling oversees marketing efforts for UPS’s global logistics and distribution services. Most of his 23 years with UPS have been spent in development roles, with six years building out e-commerce capabilities and another six years in new product development, where he oversaw the rise of some of UPS’s largest product and marketing initiatives. Want to learn more about Alan? Check out his bio.

(2:07 p.m. ET) This concludes Joachim’s SAM demo. Be sure to check out SAM Labs on Twitter: @samlabs

The last thing you need when you’re bold enough to create an app, fix something in your house, or hack a product, is to give up because you’re not an expert.” 

Interested in learning more about SAM Labs? Check them out on Twitter.

“Think of SAMs as the Lego for the iPad generation. The more you do it, the more fun it is, the easier it gets, and the more innovative your ideas become”

(1:58 p.m. ET) Joachim Horn is on the TED@UPS stage to share his big idea, SAM Labs.

(1:54 p.m. ET) We are taking a break to set up for our next speaker. In the meantime… 


(1:53 p.m. ET)
This concludes Mark’s presentation. Be sure to subscribe to Longitudes emails to be notified when Mark’s full talk is available in October.

“There is some trouble we should run from, and some trouble that wants to help us grow. That’s the kind of trouble that’s worth the trouble.” 

“History is filled with examples of great troublemakers who were willing to swing big.”

Pullquote share icon. Share

Trouble has a bad name, and I think trouble is actually a friend, an in-your-face kind of friend

“I saw a study recently that said 40 percent of today’s F500 companies on the S&P will be gone in 10 years. And the main reason given is the reluctance to embrace change.”

“I think we all get in this mode from time to time where we’re constantly whacking down all the problems. But the high striker makes me think of the builders.”

“I find two mindsets that determine how people deal with the trouble: the fixer mindset and builder mindset.”

“See trouble has a bad name, and I think it’s actually a friend, an in-your-face kind of friend.”

“I’m a trouble maker. I know. I don’t look very intimidating, but lately it occurs to me more and more that I’m actually paid to look for trouble.”

Mark Modesti

Mark Modesti

(1:45 p.m. ET) Next on stage is Mark Modesti on the importance of putting space between problems and solutions. Mark was a driver at UPS. Today, he uses 29 years of expertise from working within UPS’s walls to improve supply chains within other companies. Want to learn more about Mark? Check out his bio.

(1:44 p.m. ET) This concludes Esther’s presentation. Be sure to subscribe to Longitudes emails to be notified when Esther’s full talk is available in October.

“I believe that achieving Zero Hunger in our lifetime is very possible if we forge public private partnerships that bring together governments, NGOs and the private sector to invest in supply chain.”

Pullquote share icon. Share

The opportunities for logistics to make a difference are as numerous as the number of hungry people in the world

“The opportunities for logistics to make a difference are as numerous as the number of hungry people in the world.”

“Fortunately, some solutions to these logistics problems are being implemented.  In my job, I have the opportunity to work with non-governmental organizations to help strengthen broken supply chains.”

“My uncle would feed surplus cabbages to his cows or let it rot in the fields when he couldn’t sell it or get it to market. It makes me sad because his family needed the income.”

“I was born and raised in Kenya, a country where agriculture is the backbone of a bustling diverse economy. But people still go hungry there.”

“In Africa the amount of food that goes bad is enough to feed an estimated 49 million people.”

Pullquote share icon. Share

Hunger isn’t an issue of lack of food. Hunger is a logistics problem.

“In India it’s estimated that 30% of fruits and vegetables rot before they reach the market due to lack of cold storage facilities.”

“About a third of the food produced in the world is wasted.”

“This includes transportation, storage, packaging, international shipping, customs, as well as access to good roads, and tracking and visibility.”

“Hunger is a problem that involves all aspects of the supply chain”

“When we think about the problem of hunger, many people believe that the main problem is there isn’t enough food in the world. But the problem isn’t the lack of food. Hunger is a logistics problem”

“Hunger is a global epidemic—with nearly 800 million hungry people in the world”

Esther volunteering in Dadaab

Esther volunteering in Dadaab

“Dadaab is about 60 miles from the Somali border, in Northeastern Kenya. It is the largest refugee camp in the world.”

“An area designed for 90,000 is now home to nearly half a million people.”

“As we begin our descent it become clear that this arid expanse of white, blue and brown is actually a vast expanse of tents. Row upon row.”

“From the air, Dadaab isn’t visible – and then it slowly comes into focus. The huge empty expanse of red dust looks like a terracotta platter dotted with pepper”

Esther Ndichu

Esther Ndichu

(1:32 p.m. ET) Next on stage is Esther Ndichu. Esther Ndichu is responsible for the UPS Foundation’s global humanitarian engagements, where she manages solutions, operations, and support resources for external partners as they prepare for and respond to disasters. Esther Ndichu argues that hunger is a logistics issue – that food often rots miles away from the people that need it most. By solving the logistics problem she asks: can the world’s hunger problem be solved in our lifetime? Want to learn more about Esther? Check out her bio

(1:31 p.m. ET)  This concludes Scott’s presentation. Be sure to subscribe to Longitudes emails to be notified when Scott’s full talk is available in October.

 

“For today’s neighborhood business, the neighborhood is now a whole lot bigger.  The world is your neighbor. And it’s waving and it’s trying to get your attention. It’s time to wave back.”

“Companies that export have exponentially more growth opportunity than those who don’t. Knowing this, why wouldn’t you export?”

Pullquote share icon. Share

The borders most companies have difficulty crossing are the ones they have established for themselves.  Doubt.  Uncertainty.  Fear.

“International opportunity isn’t just knocking at the door – it has already eaten your porridge, sat in all three chairs, and is headed upstairs to pick out which of your beds it wants.” 

“The borders they have difficulty crossing are the ones they have established for themselves.  Doubt. Uncertainty.  Fear.”

“The vast majority of U.S. business stops at the border.  Talk about leaving money on the table – yikes!”

“Over a third of successful exporting businesses are about the same size as your favorite local clothing boutique.”

“The fact is that 98% of exporters are small and medium sized businesses.”

“How many of you envisioned a small business with fewer than 50 employees?”

“I’d like you to take a moment and visualize a successful international business.“

Scott Szwast

Scott Szwast

(1:20 p.m. ET) Scott Szwast is the first to take the stage today at TED@UPS. Scott will be redefining the global players truly at the center of our interconnected economies. Scott is a marketing director for UPS, where he works closely with companies expanding into new markets to understand the particular needs of growing organizations and to develop the solutions to support them. Want to learn more about Scott? Check out his bio.

(1:05 p.m. ET) Let’s get started! UPS’s Senior Vice President of Global Marketing, Teresa Finley is kicking the day off with some introductory remarks.

How do you move a steam engine without using train tracks? Or ship 10,000 terracotta warriors? Take a peek into the crazy array of items UPS has transported safely around the world.

(12:46 p.m. ET) We are live at TED@UPS! Guests are arriving now. In the meantime, check out our awesome list of speakers and their bios here.

TED-UPS-rgb
TED@UPS If there’s one thing every UPSer has in common, it’s that we have an irresistible desire to figure it out and get it done. And that leads to some amazing ideas. At TED@UPS, explores both the destination and the journey of ideas — big and small — that inspire us, challenge how we think or feel, and even change the world.

Click the RSS icon to subscribe to future articles by this author. RSS Feed

1 Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s